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Orca Action Month save the date - June 2020

Orca Action Month goes online!

Whamily, it’s almost that time again – time to celebrate, honor, and dive in to...
Success! Icelandic minke whale hunts end after years of WDC campaigning

Success! Icelandic minke whale hunts end after years of WDC campaigning

Following on from the news that Iceland’s fin whaling vessels will not be leaving port...
CW working from home

Supporting Our Supporters as We Work to Protect Whales and Dolphins

WDC-NA staff's new "offices" Working remotely is definitely an adjustment but I also know me...
Positive whaling news emerges from Iceland

Positive whaling news emerges from Iceland

News is emerging from Iceland that the company behind Iceland’s fin whale hunts, Hvalur hf,...

New WDC research reveals story behind whale scars

WDC research fellow and co-director of the Russian Cetacean Habitat Project, Erich Hoyt has revealed that one of the most mysterious whale species form long-term alliances.

By identifying individual whales by scars on their bodies, the recently release research highlights that Baird’s beaked whales Baird’s beaked whales , sometimes called giant bottlenose whales, seem to prefer the company of specific individuals.

Erich calls on all hunting of the species to be halted while more information is gathered about their complex social structure.

Read more on the BBC website here.

More on the Russian habitat project here.