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COVID 19- Canceling WDC Travel, Not Momentum

COVID 19- Canceling WDC Travel, Not Momentum

I am writing this on the evening of Tuesday March 10th, just hours after the...
How we’re tackling whaling in Norway

How we’re tackling whaling in Norway

We’re helping to spearhead a campaign – supported by an international coalition of almost 40...
Record breaker Riptide the orca swims from Iceland to Lebanon

Record breaker Riptide the orca swims from Iceland to Lebanon

A male orca, commonly known as Riptide, has been spotted in waters around Beirut, Lebanon,...
How do you thank someone who has changed your life?

How do you thank someone who has changed your life?

*This is the third part of a three-part blog series. You can read the first...

New WDC research reveals story behind whale scars

WDC research fellow and co-director of the Russian Cetacean Habitat Project, Erich Hoyt has revealed that one of the most mysterious whale species form long-term alliances.

By identifying individual whales by scars on their bodies, the recently release research highlights that Baird’s beaked whales Baird’s beaked whales , sometimes called giant bottlenose whales, seem to prefer the company of specific individuals.

Erich calls on all hunting of the species to be halted while more information is gathered about their complex social structure.

Read more on the BBC website here.

More on the Russian habitat project here.