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Breaking down the racial barriers to Whale and Dolphin Conservation

Breaking down the racial barriers to Whale and Dolphin Conservation

The recovery of whale populations is key to mitigating climate change. Climate change disproportionately impacts...
Orca Action Month save the date - June 2020

Orca Action Month goes online!

Whamily, it’s almost that time again – time to celebrate, honor, and dive in to...
CW working from home

Supporting Our Supporters as We Work to Protect Whales and Dolphins

WDC-NA staff's new "offices" Working remotely is definitely an adjustment but I also know me...
Dolphins sync when they work together

Dolphins sync when they work together

A new study has shown male bottlenose dolphins synchronise their physical and verbal actions when...

Whale song could reveal true impact of slaughter

A team of scientists is about to leave New Zealand aboard a research ship on a mission to discover just how badly whale hunts have affected the blue whale population in the Southern Ocean.

The research ship, Tangaroa will track blue whale song using state-of-the-art listening equipment over a six week period in order to work out exactly how many remain.

Fifty years ago, blue whales in the Southern Ocean numbered more than 250,000 but, due to commercial whaling, that number fell to only about 2000.

Amazingly, the blue whale song is so loud, and the ship’s equipment so advanced, the scientist should be able to start tracking the whales not long after leaving port in Wellington.