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We need whale poo 📷 WDC NA

Whales are our climate allies – meet the scientists busy proving it

At Whale and Dolphin Conservation, we're working hard to bring whales and the ocean into...

It’s Time To Breach The Snake River Dams

The Snake River dams were controversial even before they were built.  While they were still...
Save the whale. Save the world.

Climate giants – how whales can help save the world

We know that whales, dolphins, and porpoises are amazing beings with complex social and family...
Nat Geo for Disney+ Luis Lamar

Five Facts About Orcas

Orcas, also known as killer whales, are one of the most recognizable and popular species...
Alexi Archer cropped

Meet the 2022 Interns: Alexi Archer

I am thrilled to welcome Alexi to WDC as the newest member of our Marine...
Saya

Meet the 2022 Interns: Saya Butani

I'm happy to welcome the newest member of the WDC team, Saya Butani, who is...
Block Island wind credit: Regina Asutis-Silvia

Offshore Wind: Don’t Blow It

Recently, new areas were added to the growing list of potential sites for offshore wind...
Sierra

Meet the 2022 Interns: Sierra Osborne

I'm delighted to introduce WDC's Conservation Education intern for Summer 2022, Sierra Osborne! Without hesitation,...

Potential breeding ground identified for the Baltic Sea harbour porpoise

After two years of data collection and two years of statistical analyses, the EU Life+-funded project SAMBAH (Static Acoustic Monitoring of the Baltic Sea Harbour Porpoise) has estimated the critically endangered Baltic Sea harbour porpoise population to approximately 450 animals.

The data – harbour porpoise echolocation signals recorded through acoustic data loggers called C-PODs – show a clear distinction between the population inhabiting the Baltic Proper, and the more abundant population in the Western Baltic, Belt Seas and Kattegat area during May – December, the months important for reproduction. The Baltic population has been found to be concentrated mainly around the Midsjö offshore banks southeast of Öland during the summer breeding season when females give birth and mating takes place. Porpoise presence in this area was previously virtually unknown.

For the first time key questions on the abundance and distribution of the unique harbour porpoise population in the Baltic Sea can be answered and the results are expected to contribute to improved conservation status of the Baltic harbour porpoise. Four hundred and fifty might sound a lot, but it’s a small population and every individual counts!

To read more about the SAMBAH project go to http://www.sambah.org/