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Majestic fin whales

Icelandic whalers kill first fin whales in four years

As feared, whale hunters in Iceland have killed at least two fin whales, the first...
hvalur-8-whaling-vessel

Majority of Icelandic people think whaling harms their country’s reputation

A survey of Icelandic people has confirmed that the majority believe whaling damages Iceland's reputation. ...
A magnificent sei whale © Christopher Swann

Japan Begins Commercial Whaling Season

Sei whale © Christopher Swann Japanese whalers have left port to begin this year's annual...

Pumps and conveyor belts. How could more whales help save us?

University of Alaska Fairbanks Master's student, Dana Bloch, retrieves a CTD that is used to...

Teeth stolen from dead sperm whales

Valuable teeth have been stolen from some of the carcasses of the seven beached sperm whales that died earlier in the week on Parara beach, Yorke Peninsula in South Australia.

South Australian authorities have issued warnings that action will be taken against members of the public if they go near the dead whales. Regulations state that a person who is on land must not move closer than 50 metres to a marine mammal or they could face a fine of up to $100,000.

Mass strandings involving seven sperm whales are rare and samples from the dead whales will now be taken to try to discover why the incident occurred. It is thought that one of the whales could have been ill and the others followed the creature into the shallow waters. They may also have become trapped after following prey close into the shore.

Find out more about why whales and dolphins strand.