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A Southern Resident killer whale leaps into the air. The Southern Residents are an endangered population of fish-eating killer whales. Credit: NOAA

Southern Resident Orcas Receive Oregon Endangered Species Protections

February 16, 2024 - Contact: Regina Asmutis-Silvia, Whale and Dolphin Conservation, (508) 451-3853, [email protected] Brady...
Pilgrim and her calf in December 2022 © Florida Fish and Wildlife Conservation Commission, taken under NOAA permit #20556-01

Critically endangered whale dies due to inaction of Biden administration

Pilgrim and her calf in December 2022 © Florida Fish and Wildlife Conservation Commission, taken...
© Clearwater Marine Aquarium Research Institute, taken under NOAA permit 24359. Funded by NOAA Fisheries and Georgia Department of Natural Resources.

Critically endangered North Atlantic right whale found dead off Georgia’s coast

February 13, 2024 - On February 13, a North Atlantic right whale was reported dead...
#5120 not entangled in July 2021 
© Gine Lonati, University of New Brunswick. Taken under DFO Canada Sara Permit

Entanglement rope of North Atlantic right whale identified

On February 14th, the National Marine Fisheries Service (NMFS) announced it had identified the fishing...

Japan seeks to circumvent the IWC to achieve support for whaling

Japan is continuing a strategy of bypassing the International Whaling Commission (the international body the regulates whale hunting) by seeking to recruit scientific support for its commercial whaling activity in the Antarctic.

Various news reports state that, on the 2nd Sept, Japan decided to reduce its Antarctic whaling programme to only hunt minke whales after strong international criticism and ban by the U.N.’s top court.

On March 31, the International Court of Justice ordered a halt to the ‘research’ whaling program in the Antarctic, ruling that it is not for scientific purposes as the Japanese government had claimed.

The current program of hunts in Antarctica has a unilaterally-set quota (number of whales it can kill) of 1,035 and targets three kinds of whales – minke, fin and humpback. 

In anticipation of a renewed debate at the IWC following the heavy criticism by the International Court of Justice, Japan has sought to recruit scientific support for its hunt outside and before the meeting through a voluntary review process’

A number of country allies that have been recruited by Japan over the last few years are expected to attend at the IWC meeting to try and support Japan’s demands to renew commercial whaling.

You can follow the debates at the IWC here direct from WDC.