Skip to content
All articles
  • All articles
  • About whales & dolphins
  • Create healthy seas
  • End captivity
  • Fundraising
  • Green Whale
  • Prevent bycatch
  • Prevent deaths in nets
  • Stop whaling
The Codfather being good with Anvil kick feeding right next to them_0761 branded

Spout Spotters: Boater Safety Around Whales Online Course Launches

After countless hours behind the computer, bountiful snacks, and a few stress relieving walks with...
WDC team at UN Ocean conference

Give the ocean a chance – our message from the UN Ocean Conference

I'm looking out over the River Tejo in Lisbon, Portugal, reflecting on the astounding resilience...
65556ab2635fdab7b4e12265b9623d64

Stream to Sea: Orca Action Month 2022

This June was an exceptionally busy and exciting Orca Month, starting with a somewhat surprising...
We need whale poo 📷 WDC NA

Whales are our climate allies – meet the scientists busy proving it

At Whale and Dolphin Conservation, we're working hard to bring whales and the ocean into...

It’s Time To Breach The Snake River Dams

The Snake River dams were controversial even before they were built.  While they were still...
Save the whale. Save the world.

Climate giants – how whales can help save the world

We know that whales, dolphins, and porpoises are amazing beings with complex social and family...
Nat Geo for Disney+ Luis Lamar

Five Facts About Orcas

Orcas, also known as killer whales, are one of the most recognizable and popular species...
Alexi Archer cropped

Meet the 2022 Interns: Alexi Archer

I am thrilled to welcome Alexi to WDC as the newest member of our Marine...

It’s White Alright …!!

In the past year, global attention has been on a young albino bottlenose dolphin calf called Angel (or Shoujo) who was captured in the Taiji drive hunts in January. Angel is currently living in small, cramped and confined conditions in the Taiji Aquarium where sadly her life will be a far cry from what she would have experienced had she been left with her family in the wild. However, for another albino bottlenose dolphin the future is hopefully much brighter!

Researchers at the Blue World Institute in Croatia knew that there was an albino dolphin in their survey area of the Adriatic and Mediterranean Seas but no good quality photographs existed and therefore very little was known about its sex, age, health and condition. A chance encounter the other day soon put paid to some of their questions as they encountered “Albus” happily feeding alongside another normal coloured bottlenose dolphin. Given the behaviour of the two dolphins, they are making an educated guess that Albus is in fact a “he” as adult male bottlenose dolphins in the Adriatic usually spend their time in pairs or small groups and only join females when it’s time to mate.

In general, albino dolphins are as healthy as those with normal colouration, however there can be some associated issues that affect their vision and/or hearing, they may find it more difficult to attract a mate and may face a higher risk of sun-damage. 

Albus (latin for “white”) however has successfully made it to adulthood and it is hoped that he will live a long and happy life swimming wild and free.