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Majestic fin whales

Icelandic whalers kill first fin whales in four years

As feared, whale hunters in Iceland have killed at least two fin whales, the first...
hvalur-8-whaling-vessel

Majority of Icelandic people think whaling harms their country’s reputation

A survey of Icelandic people has confirmed that the majority believe whaling damages Iceland's reputation. ...
A magnificent sei whale © Christopher Swann

Japan Begins Commercial Whaling Season

Sei whale © Christopher Swann Japanese whalers have left port to begin this year's annual...

Pumps and conveyor belts. How could more whales help save us?

University of Alaska Fairbanks Master's student, Dana Bloch, retrieves a CTD that is used to...

New Zealanders Want to Pay More Tax

A report published this week shows a large majority of New Zealanders are prepared to pay a ‘Dolphin Tax’ to stop New Zealand dolphins dying in fishing nets.

The report was commissioned by Whale and Dolphin Conservation. It was presented in summary form to the Biennial meeting of the Marine Mammal Society which was held in Dunedin late last year.

The New Zealand Dolphin (an umbrella term for Hector’s and Māui dolphins) is unique to NZ and numbers are in rapid decline, primarily due to entanglement in fishing nets. The North Island population in particular (Māui dolphins) has an estimated population of fewer than 55 adults and only about 15 breeding females.

Biologist Gemma McGrath, a WDC consultant working in NZ, explains that “The New Zealand dolphin is doomed unless urgent action is taken to stop destructive fishing methods. We recognise that this will cost money and the really important finding from our study is that New Zealanders are prepared to pay extra for fish so non-destructive methods can be used.”

WDC, other international and local conservation organisations and marine mammal scientists believe the best means of achieving protection for the dolphins is to declare a national Dolphin Sanctuary everywhere the dolphins are found and for non-destructive fishing methods to be required within this sanctuary.

A summary of the paper and the full report can be downloaded below in electronic form. Printed copies of the report are available on request.

For further information or comment please contact Gemma McGrath on +64 276943533

ASSESSING NEW ZEALANDERS’ WILLINGNESS-TO-PAY TO PROTECT THE ENDANGERED NEW ZEALAND DOLPHIN (CEPHALORHYNCHUS HECTORI)A BENEFIT-COST ANALYSIS COMPARING THREE SCENARIOS