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We need whale poo 📷 WDC NA

Whales are our climate allies – meet the scientists busy proving it

At Whale and Dolphin Conservation, we're working hard to bring whales and the ocean into...

It’s Time To Breach The Snake River Dams

The Snake River dams were controversial even before they were built.  While they were still...
Save the whale. Save the world.

Climate giants – how whales can help save the world

We know that whales, dolphins, and porpoises are amazing beings with complex social and family...
Nat Geo for Disney+ Luis Lamar

Five Facts About Orcas

Orcas, also known as killer whales, are one of the most recognizable and popular species...
Alexi Archer cropped

Meet the 2022 Interns: Alexi Archer

I am thrilled to welcome Alexi to WDC as the newest member of our Marine...
Saya

Meet the 2022 Interns: Saya Butani

I'm happy to welcome the newest member of the WDC team, Saya Butani, who is...
Block Island wind credit: Regina Asutis-Silvia

Offshore Wind: Don’t Blow It

Recently, new areas were added to the growing list of potential sites for offshore wind...
Sierra

Meet the 2022 Interns: Sierra Osborne

I'm delighted to introduce WDC's Conservation Education intern for Summer 2022, Sierra Osborne! Without hesitation,...

How not to save a species!

Less than a week after the International Whaling Commission (IWC) urged the Government of New Zealand to do more to save the critically endangered Maui’s dolphin there has been a dramatic turn of events.  Instead of establishing more protective measures to save this endemic species, the NZ Government have in fact opened up a potential 3,000 square kilometres of the West Coast North Island Marine Mammal Sanctuary – the Maui dolphins home – for oil and gas drilling. 

New Zealand dolphin (Hector's dolphin)

This decision demonstrates the NZ government’s complete indifference to the plight of this population of the New Zealand dolphin. At this stage however, the most important threat to these dolphins remains being caught in nets. If these are not eliminated from the dolphin’s habitat there will probably be no dolphins left by the time the oil rigs start drilling.

In the meantime, as there will be an election in New Zealand in late September, WDC is busy lobbying politicians to advocate policies designed to protect the dolphins, namely the declaration of a real sanctuary (and not one that can be opened up for industry on a whim) which provides protection from nets, oil and gas extraction, sea bed mining and other threats – let’s just hope it’s not too late.