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Majestic fin whales

Icelandic whalers kill first fin whales in four years

As feared, whale hunters in Iceland have killed at least two fin whales, the first...
hvalur-8-whaling-vessel

Majority of Icelandic people think whaling harms their country’s reputation

A survey of Icelandic people has confirmed that the majority believe whaling damages Iceland's reputation. ...
A magnificent sei whale © Christopher Swann

Japan Begins Commercial Whaling Season

Sei whale © Christopher Swann Japanese whalers have left port to begin this year's annual...

Pumps and conveyor belts. How could more whales help save us?

University of Alaska Fairbanks Master's student, Dana Bloch, retrieves a CTD that is used to...

Orphaned wild orca reappears with own family

Springer, believed to be the first orca to be rescued, rehabilitated and successfully released back into the wild, has been spotted for the first time this summer by researchers in the waters off British Columbia. Excitingly, she was accompanied by her calf, first seen in 2013. This is particularly significant as it means the calf has survived its first year of life, once of the most challenging times for an orca.

In January 2002, Springer (or A73) was found apart from her pod and ill in Puget Sound, near Seattle. Her mother was dead and it was thought that she was unlikely to survive on her own. She was then held in a huge ocean pen whilst a plan was formulated. Later, in July 2002 she was transported to Blackfish Sound, near Alert Bay off northern Vancouver Island, held in another sea pen and then released when her pod appeared.