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Captive Orca Nakai Dies at SeaWorld San Diego

credit: SeaWorld San Diego An orca has died while in captivity at SeaWorld San Diego....
A fluke of a North Atlantic right whale lifts out of the water

Federal Proposal Aims to Protect Endangered Right Whales From Ship Strikes

For Immediate Release, July 29, 2022 WASHINGTON- The National Marine Fisheries Service proposed a rule...
Common bottlenose dolphin

100 bottlenose dolphins hunted in Faroe Islands

This morning, (July 29th), 100 bottlenose dolphins were killed in Skálafjörður on the Faroe Islands. The...
North Atlantic right whale. Photo by Regina Asmutis-Sylvia

Update on Snow Cone – Critically Endangered Right Whale Who Gave Birth Despite Chronic Entanglement

July 2022 - Fisheries and Oceans Canada has reported that Snow Cone was spotted on...

More bad news for Sea World as poor financial results are revealed

Following the recent 13 percent fall in visitor numbers, Sea World’s first quarter earnings for 2014 have now been released and show an 11 percent decrease on last year’s first quarter to $212.3 million. The latest fall comes on the back of the recent negative, global public reaction to the captivity industry which followed the release of the film, Blackfish.  The film, which has gripped audiences around the world, looks into the shocking death of Sea World trainer, Dawn Brancheau, who was killed in 2010 when the orca Tillikum dragged her under the water in front of horrified spectators at Sea World in Orlando, Florida. The film also looks at many other similar incidents and raises safety questions about the wider captivity industry as a whole.

Sea World recently tried to discredit the film and its claims that wild killer whales live more than twice as long as those in SeaWorld. But the discovery near Vancouver Island two weeks ago of a 103-year-old orca whale (named Granny J2) seems to have put paid to Sea World’s argument.