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Image: Peter Flood

Biden Administration Sinks Emergency Petition to Shield Right Whale Moms, Calves From Vessel Strikes

Image: Peter Flood For Immediate Release, January 20, 2023 WASHINGTON- The National Marine Fisheries Service...
A whale swims underwater while white text to the left of the whale says "AmazonSmile does make an impact to charities"

Amazon Announces End of AmazonSmile Program

Amazon announced on January 19th, 2023 that it is ending its AmazonSmile donation program by...

Automated cruelty – vending machines in Japan now dispense dead whale

In an effort to prop up the cruel and declining whaling industry in Japan, one...
An orca lies in the surf as people look at it.

Orca Found Dead on Florida Beach

Credit: Flagler County Sheriff's Office On January 11th, a 21-foot-long female orca died after stranding...

More bad news for Sea World as poor financial results are revealed

Following the recent 13 percent fall in visitor numbers, Sea World’s first quarter earnings for 2014 have now been released and show an 11 percent decrease on last year’s first quarter to $212.3 million. The latest fall comes on the back of the recent negative, global public reaction to the captivity industry which followed the release of the film, Blackfish.  The film, which has gripped audiences around the world, looks into the shocking death of Sea World trainer, Dawn Brancheau, who was killed in 2010 when the orca Tillikum dragged her under the water in front of horrified spectators at Sea World in Orlando, Florida. The film also looks at many other similar incidents and raises safety questions about the wider captivity industry as a whole.

Sea World recently tried to discredit the film and its claims that wild killer whales live more than twice as long as those in SeaWorld. But the discovery near Vancouver Island two weeks ago of a 103-year-old orca whale (named Granny J2) seems to have put paid to Sea World’s argument.