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We need whale poo 📷 WDC NA

Whales are our climate allies – meet the scientists busy proving it

At Whale and Dolphin Conservation, we're working hard to bring whales and the ocean into...

It’s Time To Breach The Snake River Dams

The Snake River dams were controversial even before they were built.  While they were still...
Save the whale. Save the world.

Climate giants – how whales can help save the world

We know that whales, dolphins, and porpoises are amazing beings with complex social and family...
Nat Geo for Disney+ Luis Lamar

Five Facts About Orcas

Orcas, also known as killer whales, are one of the most recognizable and popular species...
Alexi Archer cropped

Meet the 2022 Interns: Alexi Archer

I am thrilled to welcome Alexi to WDC as the newest member of our Marine...
Saya

Meet the 2022 Interns: Saya Butani

I'm happy to welcome the newest member of the WDC team, Saya Butani, who is...
Block Island wind credit: Regina Asutis-Silvia

Offshore Wind: Don’t Blow It

Recently, new areas were added to the growing list of potential sites for offshore wind...
Sierra

Meet the 2022 Interns: Sierra Osborne

I'm delighted to introduce WDC's Conservation Education intern for Summer 2022, Sierra Osborne! Without hesitation,...

Massive wind farms approved in Moray Firth waters

On Wednesday, 19th March, the Scottish government announced that two huge wind farms will be built in the Moray Firth in Scotland. WDC are supportive of a move away from fossil fuels (although this decision does not mean that is a certainty) and wind currently seems a realistic alternative. But we are anxious about the potential impacts on the marine wildlife in the region, especially during the intensive phase of noisy construction.

Middlegrunden Wind FarmThis decision has not come as a surprise to us. WDC has been engaging with the government, developers and scientists involved since the projects were first announced several years ago. We responded to the public consultation, raising our concerns, and objecting unless measures were put in place to monitor marine mammals and mitigate any potential impacts.

There are uncertainties – big ones – and this is our biggest challenge. We don’t know much about what impacts these large wind developments might have on the dolphin, porpoise and whale populations that live in the Moray Firth. Our colleagues, such as the RSPB, who specialise in birds and fish share our concerns. Dolphins, seals, seabirds and some species of fish (for example salmon) are offered a high level of protection through European law. Scientists have hypothesised that there will be some impacts on the bottlenose dolphins in the ‘short-term’ (the duration of construction – likely to be many years) but that populations will recover after that.

Only with a well thought through and funded monitoring plan, effective noise reduction and good reporting will we be able to understand if the scientific predictions are accurate.

Details were not provided in the announcement or supporting documentation for Beatrice or MORL  developments. Monitoring and mitigation plans will be developed over the coming months, and WDC shall be scrutinising these closely.

In parallel, we are continuing our campaigning and research underpinning the putting in place of a coherent network of marine protected areas. A Search Location for minke whales has been identified in the Moray Firth (this possible MPA was submitted to the government by WDC back in 2012). The question we are posing is ‘How do these government processes join up?’