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Clear WDC’s Amazon Wishlist for Giving Tuesday

The holiday season is knocking on our doors and Giving Tuesday is coming up soon!...
Fin whales are targeted by Icelandic whalers

Speaking truth to power – my week giving whales a voice

The International Whaling Commission (IWC) meeting is where governments come together to make decisions about whaling...
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Spout Spotters: Boater Safety Around Whales Online Course Launches

After countless hours behind the computer, bountiful snacks, and a few stress relieving walks with...
WDC team at UN Ocean conference

Give the ocean a chance – our message from the UN Ocean Conference

I'm looking out over the River Tejo in Lisbon, Portugal, reflecting on the astounding resilience...
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Stream to Sea: Orca Action Month 2022

This June was an exceptionally busy and exciting Orca Month, starting with a somewhat surprising...
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Whales are our climate allies – meet the scientists busy proving it

At Whale and Dolphin Conservation, we're working hard to bring whales and the ocean into...

It’s Time To Breach The Snake River Dams

The Snake River dams were controversial even before they were built.  While they were still...
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Five Facts About Orcas

Orcas, also known as killer whales, are one of the most recognizable and popular species...

What does “success” looks like for WDC’s projects and campaigns

Perhaps one metric for success that we should strive for is to have the number of North Atlantic right whales greater than the number of people working to save them. With fewer than 500 North Atlantic right whales remaining, we are far from meeting that goal. The fatalities they face from ship strikes and fishing gear entanglements remain the primary threats, but the army of people working to eradicate these threats and save the whales is inspiring.

Sign an updated petition to maintain the protections of the Ship Strike Speed Rule

For example last month WDC, along with the Humane Society of the United States, Center for Biological Diversity, Defenders of Wildlife and 14 other conservation organizations, scientists and academics, asked the US government to maintain a fishery restriction in right whale calving habitat to protect the vulnerable newborn right whales from entanglement. Then Dr. Michael Moore of the Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution published an essay last week on the welfare impacts of entanglements on right whales.  Coincidentally, this week Clay George and his team from the Georgia Department of Natural Resources removed more than 280 feet of fishing line from an entangled right whale, highlights the importance of maintaining the fishery restrictions. 

Another example of the inspirational work being done is the success of our efforts petitioning the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) to permanently extended the Ship Strike Speed Rule, which reduced the risk of ship strikes to right whales by nearly 90%!

Unfortunately, this rule is already being challenged by the American Pilots Association, and today I am asking you to sign an updated petition to maintain the protections of the ship strike speed rule throughout the entire east coast of the US. 

We’ve all heard parents, teachers, and caregivers encourage young children to use their words to express their opinion and exert their influence – Please become part of this impressive army of scientists, advocates, and conservationists and use the power of your words to tell the US government that right whales deserved to be protected.