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We need whale poo 📷 WDC NA

Whales are our climate allies – meet the scientists busy proving it

At Whale and Dolphin Conservation, we're working hard to bring whales and the ocean into...

It’s Time To Breach The Snake River Dams

The Snake River dams were controversial even before they were built.  While they were still...
Save the whale. Save the world.

Climate giants – how whales can help save the world

We know that whales, dolphins, and porpoises are amazing beings with complex social and family...
Nat Geo for Disney+ Luis Lamar

Five Facts About Orcas

Orcas, also known as killer whales, are one of the most recognizable and popular species...
Alexi Archer cropped

Meet the 2022 Interns: Alexi Archer

I am thrilled to welcome Alexi to WDC as the newest member of our Marine...
Saya

Meet the 2022 Interns: Saya Butani

I'm happy to welcome the newest member of the WDC team, Saya Butani, who is...
Block Island wind credit: Regina Asutis-Silvia

Offshore Wind: Don’t Blow It

Recently, new areas were added to the growing list of potential sites for offshore wind...
Sierra

Meet the 2022 Interns: Sierra Osborne

I'm delighted to introduce WDC's Conservation Education intern for Summer 2022, Sierra Osborne! Without hesitation,...

HotSpots – A Round up of UK Autumn 2013 Sightings

In the crisp, clean mornings of autumn the cold can catch you by surprise and so can whales and dolphins; they seem to turn up when you least expect it!

Although most sightings are reported during the summer months, whales and dolphins can be seen around the UK all year, and during our recent autumn the majority of the sightings were from the English Channel, with encounters also reported from Scotland and Wales.

In September three bottlenose dolphins were spotted in the English Channel by the Seahorse Trust, on the same trip they also spotted what was possibly a fin whale. It can be difficult to distinguish Fin whales from other rorqual whales, such as the sei whale, when at sea. So, when spotting whales and dolphins, it’s important to describe what you see rather than make assumptions based on expectation; see the species guide on our website, or download our identification guide for pointers.  

Bottlenose dolphins were also spotted in the English Channel in October; they were accompanied by a group of c. 50 common dolphins that were travelling alongside the ferry and bow riding.

In the Firth of Forth, several groups of bottlenose dolphins were watched by Marilyn Nugent for half an hour whilst walking the coastal path, the dolphins headed out of Firth of Forth and into Largo Bay. There were about six groups with many of which had small calves.

Risso’s dolphins were seen on a number of occasions Off Bardsey Island, North Wales, in September and October. Usually spotted in small groups, the dolphins hung around for a while close to shore. We have been sent a number of photos of the dolphins and have been able to match individual animals with those we have photographed during the fieldwork we undertaken from Bardsey Island since 1999.

There is so much to see out there so KEEP SPOTTING, even through frozen hands and fluffy breath, so keep sending us your sightings, photos and videos.