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Peter Flood mom and calf

Emergency Petition Seeks to Shield Right Whale Moms, Calves From Vessel Strikes

For Immediate Release, November 1, 2022 WASHINGTON-Conservation groups filed an emergency rulemaking petition with the...
The Yushin Maru catcher ship of the Japanese whaling fleet injures a whale with its first harpoon attempt, and takes a further three harpoon shots before finally killing the badly injured fleeing whale. Finally they drowned the mammal beneath the harpooon deck of the ship to kill it.  Southern Ocean.  07.01.2006

Moves to overturn whaling ban rejected

Last week, the 68th meeting of the International Whaling Commission (IWC, the body that regulates...

Nearly 500 whales die in New Zealand

The number of pilot whales that have died following a mass stranding in New Zealand...

200 pilot whales killed in latest Faroese slaughter

More than 200 pilot whales have been slaughtered in Sandagerði (Torshavn) in the Faroe Islands....

Sperm whales strand in the Faroe Islands

In a drama unfolding from Wednesday, four sperm whales travelled into the shallow waters between the main islands of Streymoy and Esturoy in the Faroe Islands amidst growing fears that they would strand on the shore.  As helpless onlookers watched, one whale, who already appeared to be injured, was swept into a bridge piling. Local Faroese people have been watching and waiting to see what will become of the whales. Large vessels are unable to navigate into the shallows where the whales have become isolated and so observers are continuing to wait with the hope that the whales will find their way back out to sea.

Latest reports from the Faroes indicate that one whale stranded on the shore and died overnight, while two other whales appear to have been freed and moved off into deeper waters. One whale remains stuck in the same location.

Responding to strandings or beachings of sperm and other large whales is extremely challenging. Once stranded, attempts to refloat these whales are sometimes possible, but often individuals must be humanely put to sleep if they are ill, injured, or incapable of being returned to deeper waters. Although the reasons are not fully understood, highly social toothed whales, such as sperm and pilot whales, are known to strand in large numbers and even if refloated, often linger nearby unwilling to abandon pod mates or distressed family members who remain behind.

Whales and dolphins suffer physically as a result of being out of the water for prolonged periods of time, an experience which is undoubtedly psychological stressful. In addition, a stranded whale or dolphin could be suffering from an underlying, undiagnosed medical condition.