Skip to content
All articles
  • All articles
  • About whales & dolphins
  • Create healthy seas
  • End captivity
  • Fundraising
  • Green Whale
  • Prevent bycatch
  • Prevent deaths in nets
  • Stop whaling

It’s Time To Breach The Snake River Dams

The Snake River dams were controversial even before they were built.  While they were still...
Save the whale. Save the world.

Climate giants – how whales can help save the world

We know that whales, dolphins, and porpoises are amazing beings with complex social and family...
Nat Geo for Disney+ Luis Lamar

Five Facts About Orcas

Orcas, also known as killer whales, are one of the most recognizable and popular species...
Alexi Archer cropped

Meet the 2022 Interns: Alexi Archer

I am thrilled to welcome Alexi to WDC as the newest member of our Marine...
Saya

Meet the 2022 Interns: Saya Butani

I'm happy to welcome the newest member of the WDC team, Saya Butani, who is...
Block Island wind credit: Regina Asutis-Silvia

Offshore Wind: Don’t Blow It

Recently, new areas were added to the growing list of potential sites for offshore wind...
Sierra

Meet the 2022 Interns: Sierra Osborne

I'm delighted to introduce WDC's Conservation Education intern for Summer 2022, Sierra Osborne! Without hesitation,...
Boto © Fernando Trujillo

Meet the legendary pink river dolphins

Botos don't look or live like other dolphins. Flamingo-pink all over with super-skinny snouts and...

WDC launches a new ID guide to the Whales and Dolphins of Iceland

WDC was back in Reykjavik this week to launch the latest in our popular series of international field ID guides – the Whales and Dolphins of Iceland. 

Thanks to our sponsors, Icelandic whale watch operators Elding and Laki Tours, 10,000 bilingual copies will now be distributed throughout Iceland’s booming tourist sector encouraging visitors to see for themselves the incredible wildlife in this unique land. In 2013, for the first time ever, tourism income has outstripped revenue from fisheries –  traditionally Iceland’s largest industry. By 2016 Iceland will welcome one million visitors each year with whale watching being one of the top ‘must do’ activities.

These new guides are a great introduction to Iceland’s marine wildlife whilst also offering visitors the opportunity to make informed decisions during their stay. Choosing a responsible boat operator to enhance your whale watch experience and avoiding any restaurant, hotel or shop that serves whale meat will deliver a strong message to the Icelandic authorities. The vast majority of visitors to this friendly island want to see these majestic creatures as nature intended and not served up on a plate in the name of ‘tradition’.