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Clear WDC’s Amazon Wishlist for Giving Tuesday

UPDATE: We are thrilled to report that everything was donated off of our Amazon Wishlist...
Fin whales are targeted by Icelandic whalers

Speaking truth to power – my week giving whales a voice

The International Whaling Commission (IWC) meeting is where governments come together to make decisions about whaling...
The Codfather being good with Anvil kick feeding right next to them_0761 branded

Spout Spotters: Boater Safety Around Whales Online Course Launches

After countless hours behind the computer, bountiful snacks, and a few stress relieving walks with...
WDC team at UN Ocean conference

Give the ocean a chance – our message from the UN Ocean Conference

I'm looking out over the River Tejo in Lisbon, Portugal, reflecting on the astounding resilience...
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Stream to Sea: Orca Action Month 2022

This June was an exceptionally busy and exciting Orca Month, starting with a somewhat surprising...
We need whale poo ? WDC NA

Whales are our climate allies – meet the scientists busy proving it

At Whale and Dolphin Conservation, we're working hard to bring whales and the ocean into...

It’s Time To Breach The Snake River Dams

The Snake River dams were controversial even before they were built.  While they were still...
Nat Geo for Disney+ Luis Lamar

Five Facts About Orcas

Orcas, also known as killer whales, are one of the most recognizable and popular species...

Everybody Loves Whales!

Anyone who loves animals reacts strongly to the images of whales and dolphins being hunted and killed, and we tend to direct our anger toward those we see as responsible for these brutal attacks. Sometimes we can forget, however, that it is a select few we are fighting – namely, those who are directly involved in hunting humpbacks in the Southern Ocean or herding dolphins into coves for slaughter – and target our wrath towards a country as a whole, further polarizing the issue. It is important to remember that there are people in those countries who love whales and dolphins just as we do, and people who are seeking to learn more about them. A recent display of light imagery in the form of humpback whales (“Urban Whale Watching” ) in Japan attracted the attention of a large number of passers-by; Cameras were pulled out to capture the moment, children tried to touch the whales swimming overhead, and the crowd audibly gasped as the whales rolled or opened their mouths.

The beautiful images, though made with computers and lights on the side of a building, captured the majestic grace of a whale in its natural environment. Inspiring those who live in countries that still participate in the killing of whales and dolphins, and providing them with an opportunity to see these creatures in the wild (or as close to the wild as an urban, computer-generated image can get) is an important part in the fight to end these hunts. We can work on changing the system from the inside out, as well as continuing the fight from our end of the globe. Artists like Bryant Austin (http://www.studiocosmos.com/) who has taken his amazing photos to whaling nations like Japan and Norway, allow citizens of these countries to see whales from a different perspective, and gives them the opportunity to make up their own minds. Bridging the gap between the viewpoints of nations starts with finding common ground. Looking at the reactions of the viewers in the Urban Whale Watching video, I think we have a good chance to reach out to our fellow animal-lovers and show them how amazing whales and dolphins are, and how important it is that we protect them from the brutal and useless killings that still threatens them. It’s not always “us against them” when it comes to conservation, it’s everybody who loves them.