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We need whale poo 📷 WDC NA

Whales are our climate allies – meet the scientists busy proving it

At Whale and Dolphin Conservation, we're working hard to bring whales and the ocean into...

It’s Time To Breach The Snake River Dams

The Snake River dams were controversial even before they were built.  While they were still...
Save the whale. Save the world.

Climate giants – how whales can help save the world

We know that whales, dolphins, and porpoises are amazing beings with complex social and family...
Nat Geo for Disney+ Luis Lamar

Five Facts About Orcas

Orcas, also known as killer whales, are one of the most recognizable and popular species...
Alexi Archer cropped

Meet the 2022 Interns: Alexi Archer

I am thrilled to welcome Alexi to WDC as the newest member of our Marine...
Saya

Meet the 2022 Interns: Saya Butani

I'm happy to welcome the newest member of the WDC team, Saya Butani, who is...
Block Island wind credit: Regina Asutis-Silvia

Offshore Wind: Don’t Blow It

Recently, new areas were added to the growing list of potential sites for offshore wind...
Sierra

Meet the 2022 Interns: Sierra Osborne

I'm delighted to introduce WDC's Conservation Education intern for Summer 2022, Sierra Osborne! Without hesitation,...

A life-line for the smallest dolphin of them all?

Throughout its limited range of only a 48km radius in the northern end of the Gulf of California, the vaquita has been rapidly declining in numbers due to incidental entanglement in drift nets and less than 200 are thought to survive. Not only the smallest but possibly the most critically endangered cetacean of them all, the vaquita may finally have a chance at survival. 

After several efforts to protect these little porpoises, for example the creation of a Biosphere Reserve in 1993 to protect the vaquita and their habitat, WWF reports that the Government of Mexico has taken a decisive step towards ensuring their future conservation at the same time as promoting sustainable fisheries by approving a new regulation, called an “official norm”.  As a result of this measure, over the course of the next 3 years, drift gillnets (the type of gear responsible for vaquita deaths) will be substituted for selective fishing gear that do not kill the world’s smallest porpoise yet still ensure a livelihood for local fishermen. 

This long awaited regulation will go some way to establishing shrimping standards within Mexico, determining the various fishing gears permitted in different zones in the country and ultimately protecting the smallest dolphin of them all.

Find out more information on the vaquita and the work that WDC has been supporting.