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We need whale poo 📷 WDC NA

Whales are our climate allies – meet the scientists busy proving it

At Whale and Dolphin Conservation, we're working hard to bring whales and the ocean into...

It’s Time To Breach The Snake River Dams

The Snake River dams were controversial even before they were built.  While they were still...
Save the whale. Save the world.

Climate giants – how whales can help save the world

We know that whales, dolphins, and porpoises are amazing beings with complex social and family...
Nat Geo for Disney+ Luis Lamar

Five Facts About Orcas

Orcas, also known as killer whales, are one of the most recognizable and popular species...
Alexi Archer cropped

Meet the 2022 Interns: Alexi Archer

I am thrilled to welcome Alexi to WDC as the newest member of our Marine...
Saya

Meet the 2022 Interns: Saya Butani

I'm happy to welcome the newest member of the WDC team, Saya Butani, who is...
Block Island wind credit: Regina Asutis-Silvia

Offshore Wind: Don’t Blow It

Recently, new areas were added to the growing list of potential sites for offshore wind...
Sierra

Meet the 2022 Interns: Sierra Osborne

I'm delighted to introduce WDC's Conservation Education intern for Summer 2022, Sierra Osborne! Without hesitation,...

Orcas in the Irish Sea

Last weekend we had a message from our friends on Bardsey Island, off the coast of North Wales, to say they had spotted a pod of orcas from land. WDC has conducted fieldwork on this beautiful, remote Welsh island for over a decade now, primarly focussing on Risso’s dolphin and harbour porpoise so we were thrilled to hear about this latest cetacean encounter.

It is quite unusual to see orcas off the Welsh Coast and so close to shore but when they are seen in these waters it usually around this time of year – late May/early June.

Previous Welsh encounters around the Pembrokeshire Islands have identified these orcas as being a part of Britain and Ireland’s only resident population  –  a small group of 5 females and 4 males – known as the West Coast Community. These orcas patrol a huge area to the west of the British Isles, from the southern Irish Sea, north to the Outer Hebrides and west along the entire length of Ireland’s Atlantic seaboard. There are concerns surrounding this isolated group of orcas though as no calves have been observed in the pod in over 20 years.

Find out more about the orcas of the British Isles and read about our fieldwork project on Bardsey Island.