Skip to content
All articles
  • All articles
  • About whales & dolphins
  • Create healthy seas
  • End captivity
  • Fundraising
  • Green Whale
  • Prevent bycatch
  • Prevent deaths in nets
  • Stop whaling
Clear the list graphic

Clear WDC’s Amazon Wishlist for Giving Tuesday

The holiday season is knocking on our doors and Giving Tuesday is coming up soon!...
Fin whales are targeted by Icelandic whalers

Speaking truth to power – my week giving whales a voice

The International Whaling Commission (IWC) meeting is where governments come together to make decisions about whaling...
The Codfather being good with Anvil kick feeding right next to them_0761 branded

Spout Spotters: Boater Safety Around Whales Online Course Launches

After countless hours behind the computer, bountiful snacks, and a few stress relieving walks with...
WDC team at UN Ocean conference

Give the ocean a chance – our message from the UN Ocean Conference

I'm looking out over the River Tejo in Lisbon, Portugal, reflecting on the astounding resilience...
65556ab2635fdab7b4e12265b9623d64

Stream to Sea: Orca Action Month 2022

This June was an exceptionally busy and exciting Orca Month, starting with a somewhat surprising...
We need whale poo ? WDC NA

Whales are our climate allies – meet the scientists busy proving it

At Whale and Dolphin Conservation, we're working hard to bring whales and the ocean into...

It’s Time To Breach The Snake River Dams

The Snake River dams were controversial even before they were built.  While they were still...
Nat Geo for Disney+ Luis Lamar

Five Facts About Orcas

Orcas, also known as killer whales, are one of the most recognizable and popular species...

Norway's dying whaling industry

It seems that despite claims that its whaling is still acceptable to Norwegians, it seems that the Norwegian public’s willingness to purchase and consume whale meat and products is still going the way of whaling all around the world – downwards at a steady rate.

http://www.nrk.no/nyheter/distrikt/nordland/1.10994696 reports that only 17 boats are actually taking up the chance to hunt whales this year, down 10% on last year (20 vessels took up the chance in 2012).

The NRK quotes fisheries commentator Knut Eirik Olsen as saying that, “the only thing that could save the industry is if the meat were to be sold in large supermarket chains, but that is not happening”.

The article makes oft repeated claims that the hunt is using sustainable quotas, but fails to note that these quotas are set unilaterally by the Norwegian Government which continues to actively seek to undermine the decision making process of the IWC.

The article notes that its getting even more difficult to find buyers for the whale meat. “CEO Ulf Ellingsen of the Ellingsen company from Skrova “Norway’s most famous buyer of whale meat”, is quoted as saying, “We will probably buy meat this year, although less than last year.”  In 2012 the company bought about 80 tons, as compared to 600 tons in the late 1970s”.

Despite the article claiming that environmentalists are no longer causing a problem for Norway WDC would like to reassure the Norwegian whaling industry that we have not forgotten them and their spurious arguments.

  • The IWC and international community has not endorsed their whaling and has not issued them quotas.
  • They remain pariahs on this issue.
  • Whaling is a dying industry that is being kept alive for political reasons rather than necessity.
  • The European fish buying market is steadily turning its back on the whalers and refusing to do business with them.

 If you want to read more on Norwegian whaling