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Majestic fin whales

Icelandic whalers kill first fin whales in four years

As feared, whale hunters in Iceland have killed at least two fin whales, the first...
hvalur-8-whaling-vessel

Majority of Icelandic people think whaling harms their country’s reputation

A survey of Icelandic people has confirmed that the majority believe whaling damages Iceland's reputation. ...
A magnificent sei whale © Christopher Swann

Japan Begins Commercial Whaling Season

Sei whale © Christopher Swann Japanese whalers have left port to begin this year's annual...

Pumps and conveyor belts. How could more whales help save us?

University of Alaska Fairbanks Master's student, Dana Bloch, retrieves a CTD that is used to...

Dolphin deaths in Australia remain a mystery

Twenty four bottlenose dolphins, almost all juveniles, have died in Adelaide’s Gulf St Vincent in the past six weeks. At the same time, thousands of inshore reef fish have washed up on local beaches. The reason for these deaths remains unknown with initial analysis of some of the dead dolphins unable to determine their cause of death. Laboratory tests of tissue samples will not be completed for another two weeks.

Local waters are up to five degrees centigrade above normal for this time of the year. At this stage the most widely accepted theory for the deaths is a toxic build up of plant-like organisms called phytoplankton, often called a ‘red tide’. Although no such tide has been observed to date, it would be the first time such a toxic build up has affected dolphins in this part of the world.