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Peter Flood mom and calf

Emergency Petition Seeks to Shield Right Whale Moms, Calves From Vessel Strikes

For Immediate Release, November 1, 2022 WASHINGTON-Conservation groups filed an emergency rulemaking petition with the...
The Yushin Maru catcher ship of the Japanese whaling fleet injures a whale with its first harpoon attempt, and takes a further three harpoon shots before finally killing the badly injured fleeing whale. Finally they drowned the mammal beneath the harpooon deck of the ship to kill it.  Southern Ocean.  07.01.2006

Moves to overturn whaling ban rejected

Last week, the 68th meeting of the International Whaling Commission (IWC, the body that regulates...

Nearly 500 whales die in New Zealand

The number of pilot whales that have died following a mass stranding in New Zealand...

200 pilot whales killed in latest Faroese slaughter

More than 200 pilot whales have been slaughtered in Sandagerði (Torshavn) in the Faroe Islands....

Ganges River Dolphin Now Down To Less Than 1800

Research in India has revealed that the population of Ganges River Dolphin has declined alarmingly from 6000 in 1982 to less than 1800, with death rates per year reaching around 160 animals. The main reasons given for this decline are the construction of more than 50 dams and other irrigation-related projects along the river, and water pollution caused by pesticides and fertilisers.

The Ganges River Dolphin is also known as the Susu, or Bhulan and has a distinctively long slender beak with sharp, pointed teeth designed for quick snapping action to capture fast prey.  Often found alone or in pairs, little is known about their behaviour as they tend to be fast moving and shy.

Nicola Hodgins, international project co-ordinator at WDC said; “We are saddened and worried by the news that the Ganges River dolphin population has declined so far. Despite being declared India’s national aquatic animal in 2009 and being categorised as endangered, the Ganges River Dolphin is in a spiral of decline. Unless action is taken the species will surely follow the baiji into the history books as the second species of dolphin to become extinct at the hands of mankind. WDC calls on the Indian government to take immediate action to reverse this trend and to ensure the future of the species.”