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We need whale poo 📷 WDC NA

Whales are our climate allies – meet the scientists busy proving it

At Whale and Dolphin Conservation, we're working hard to bring whales and the ocean into...

It’s Time To Breach The Snake River Dams

The Snake River dams were controversial even before they were built.  While they were still...
Save the whale. Save the world.

Climate giants – how whales can help save the world

We know that whales, dolphins, and porpoises are amazing beings with complex social and family...
Nat Geo for Disney+ Luis Lamar

Five Facts About Orcas

Orcas, also known as killer whales, are one of the most recognizable and popular species...
Alexi Archer cropped

Meet the 2022 Interns: Alexi Archer

I am thrilled to welcome Alexi to WDC as the newest member of our Marine...
Saya

Meet the 2022 Interns: Saya Butani

I'm happy to welcome the newest member of the WDC team, Saya Butani, who is...
Block Island wind credit: Regina Asutis-Silvia

Offshore Wind: Don’t Blow It

Recently, new areas were added to the growing list of potential sites for offshore wind...
Sierra

Meet the 2022 Interns: Sierra Osborne

I'm delighted to introduce WDC's Conservation Education intern for Summer 2022, Sierra Osborne! Without hesitation,...

South Korean PM confirms end to 'scientific' whaling plans

WDCS welcomes the fact that the Korean Times is reporting that “Despite the necessity of scientific research about whales, the government decided to only allow the studies that do not require whaling,” Prime Minister Kim Hwang-sik said during his weekly briefing to President Lee Myung-bak held on Tuesday.

Officials from the presidential office, the Prime Minister’s Office and the agriculture and fisheries ministry held a meeting recently to discuss the issue, according to sources. President Lee also reproached Agriculture Minister Suh Kyu-yong as international criticism grew, they said.

“Discussions between government ministries have been concluded in a way that effectively scraps the plan to allow whaling in coastal waters,” a senior official said on condition of anonymity. “Even if it is for scientific research, we have to take into consideration that this has emerged as a sensitive issue at home and abroad.”

Well done to Korea for listening to its own people and the international community.