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Southern Resident Orca Scat Project: update from the field

Southern Resident Orca Scat Project: update from the field

Dr. Giles, a scientist with the Orca Scat Project, and CK9 Eba on the scent...
Three Southern Resident orcas declared dead

Three Southern Resident orcas declared dead

The devastating news came late on Tuesday night – three more Southern Resident orcas lost,...
A Beautiful Coincidence: WDC partners with fan club dedicated to BTS RM

A Beautiful Coincidence: WDC partners with fan club dedicated to BTS RM

I’m not sure if I believe in fate or coincidences, but in early April, all...
We <3 Whale Poop: WDC providing support for Orca Scat Project

We <3 Whale Poop: WDC providing support for Orca Scat Project

San Juan Island, Washington. July 22, 2019: Whale and Dolphin Conservation (WDC) is thrilled to...

WDCS Condemns Use Of Dolphins As A Military Resource

A retired US Admiral has gone on record recently confirming that the US Navy has trained dolphins to detect mines and that they’re ready and willing to use them in the Strait of Hormuz, a strategically important sea passage out of the Persian Gulf. Iran has threatened to block the route as a protest against sanctions introduced in response to its nuclear policies.

As many as 80 dolphins have been trained this way if previous reports and the comment from Admiral Tim Keating are to be believed. Some reports say the dolphins are trained to drop transponders near the mines in readiness for naval disposal teams; others say the dolphins would trigger mines and die in the explosion. Whatever the method, dolphins – enlisted or free – would become a prime target for Iranian forces.

Writing in the Guardian, Peter Singer, professor of bioethics at Princeton University, accuses the US Navy of ‘speciesism’:

“Animals, or at least those who are conscious and capable of suffering or enjoying their lives, are not things for us to use in whatever way we find convenient. To believe that, because they are members of a different species, we can ignore or discount their interests is speciesism, a form of prejudice against beings who are not ‘us’ that is akin to racism and sexism.”

WDCS agrees with Professor Singer and is a signatory of the Declaration of Rights for Cetaceans