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Tahlequah, the Southern Resident orca, gives birth to healthy calf

Tahlequah, the Southern Resident orca, gives birth to healthy calf

J35 and J57. Photo by Katie Jones, Center for Whale Research / Permit #21238 Tahlequah...
Why do female orcas live so long after they stop having babies?

Why do female orcas live so long after they stop having babies?

Orcas are one of only five species known to experience menopause and females can live...
Humpback whales swim up river in Kakadu National Park

Humpback whales swim up river in Kakadu National Park

Wildlife experts in Australia's Northern Territory are monitoring a humpback whale that has travelled 18...
Rastus – the tale of an extraordinary dog and his love of dolphins

Rastus – the tale of an extraordinary dog and his love of dolphins

Rastus Dr Nicolette Scourse is an academic, educator, author and illustrator with a passion for...

Cardigan Bay Dolphins Discovered In Manx Waters

Bottlenose dolphins swimming in Douglas Bay, Isle of Man, have been recognised as the same dolphins also seen in Cardigan Bay in Wales.

Eleanor Stone, Marine Officer with the Manx Wildlife Trust posted dolphin photos on the Trust’s Facebook page where Cardigan Bay’s science officer, Sarah Perry recognised one of them.

Since then, another two dolphins in the pictures have been matched to the Cardigan Bay visitors using the method of comparing the unique marks dolphins carry on their dorsal fin.

Data collected about these dolphins is shared between the Manx Wildlife Trust, WDCS and the Sea Watch Foundation and plays an important part in teaching us where the dolphins live and how far they travel. With that knowledge, plans for protecting them can be more effective.