Vaquita

Dolphins to be used to locate highly endangered vaquita

According to reports from Mexico, the government there is to go ahead with plans to use dolphins trained by the US Navy to try to save the world's most endangered marine species, the vaquita.

Vaquita are the world’s smallest and one of the most endangered species of whale, dolphin or porpoise on the planet. Found only in Mexico’s northern Gulf of California, the population has declined by more than 75% in the past three years and currently fewer than 50 vaquita remain.

So how was the IWC for you?

So IWC66 ends with a celebration of whale-themed ties, which, believe it or not, was won by a Japanese delegate. He was sporting a bright Moby Dick themed tie. so I guess that, as it’s a whaling themed tie, the individual concerned may be allowed back into Japan’s Far Seas Fisheries building where their whaling plans are hatched.

Mexico to ban gillnets in attempt to save the vaquita

Mexico has announced that it is to permanently ban the use of gillnets in the waters where the highly endangered vaquita is found, in an attempt to save the species from extinction.

The vaquita, which translates from spanish as "little cow", is a species of porpoise, whose numbers are thought to have dropped to around 60 surviving individuals.

It is only found in the northern part of the Gulf of California where gillnets are used to catch a species of fish, the totoaba, whose future is also under threat.

Mexico’s Efforts to Save the Vaquita

As July comes to an end, so does our Species of the Month blog for the vaquita. As a final entry, Cheryl Butner from ¡Viva Vaquita! tells us more about the efforts of the Mexican Government and the measures in place to try and protect and conserve the remaining vaquita.

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