Commercial whaling

Norwegian hunters may kill nearly one thousand whales

Norway’s minke whaling season opened Saturday with whalers given an increased quota of 999, up from 880 whales last year.

The quota (number of whales they can kill) is self-allocated and set by Norway's own Fisheries Ministry, which claims that it has set the quota numbers in accordance with scientific advice from the international body that regulates whaling (International Whaling Commission - IWC). However, these inflated kill numbers are higher than would be deemed "sustainable" by the IWC's own scientific committee.

Japanese kill whale in Australian whale sanctuary

Images taken by conservation group, Sea Shepherd appear to indicate that Japanese whale hunters have been slaughtering whales in an Australian whale sanctuary.
The pictures show a dead minke whale on the deck of the whale factory ship, Nisshin Maru, which the vessels crew reportedly tried to cover up when they realised that they were being photographed.

The embarrassing discovery comes shortly after Japan's Prime, Minister Shinzo Abe arrived in Sydney to continue talks on closer defence ties with Australia.

Dead whale reportedly chopped up as gift for Chinese workers

Disturbing pictures emerging from China seem to show a whale being chopped up outside a company canteen for either dog food, or as a gift to employees from their boss.

The Brydes whale is reported to have been purchased by Risun Solar Energy’s owner for 4,000 yuan (nearly £500) from fishermen in neighbouring, coastal Zhejiang province, and then transport to the premises in Xinyu City, in Jiangxi Province.

WDC helps expose large shipment of endangered fin whale products

A coalition of conservation and animal protection organizations, including WDC has confirmed today that more than 1,500 tonnes of products from endangered fin whales were shipped from Iceland to Japan in July 2016.

The discovery comes as major conservation meeting, the Convention on International Trade in Endangered Species of Wild Fauna and Flora (CITES) considers removing key protection for whales. The 17th Meeting of the Conference of the Parties (CoP17) starts in Johannesburg, South Africa, on September 24.

Shipping giant COSCO bans transport of whale and dolphin products

Worldwide shipping company, COSCO has announced that it will no longer transport whale meat or related products on its vessels.

The global container shipping giant also stated that it will not carry shark fin related products either and will adopt stricter monitoring and regulation to ensure this policy is carried out.  

COSCO has immediately ceased all bookings and shipments of dolphin, shark, and whale related products and said that it is 'committed to...protect the environment in order to fulfil its social responsibilities.' 

Restaurants continue to fuel illegal whale hunts in Korea

Police in South Korea are continuing to catch more and more poachers involved in illegal minke whale hunting that is being driven by the vast sums of money that the meat fetches, and demand from local restaurants. 

A single minke whale can sell for up to 60 million won (around £35,000), with ‘whale meat culture’ especially strong in the cities of Ulsan, Busan, and Pohang. Jangsanpo, the home of Korea’s famous Ulsan Whale Festival is home to 20 whale meat restaurants alone.

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