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Two dolphins to be freed from captivity in South Korea

Two Indo-pacific bottlenose dolphins held at the Seoul Grand Park aquarium in South Korea are to be released back into the wild in July. 

Geumdeung and Daepo, both male dolphins, were captured in a fishing net in 1997 and 1998 respectively and have spent nearly twenty years in captivity since.

It is believed the decision to release them came from the local mayor, Park Wan-soon. The dolphins will spend the next few months being prepared for their release.

Small caterpillar may be plastic pollution solution

Researchers at Cambridge University may have discovered a solution to the huge plastic pollution problem that the world faces, and it comes in the form of a small caterpillar.

Experiments involving small moth larvae (Galleria mellonella), which eat wax in bee hives, have revealed that they can also eat their way through plastic bags! The larvae then break down the chemical bonds of plastic in the similar way to digesting beeswax.

Did toxic algae kill whales in Alaska

Officials from the US National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration say that algal toxins associated with warming surface waters could have been the reason behind the mass deaths of 44 whales in 2015 in the Gulf of Alaska.

A similar event happened in waters near the Canadian province of British Columbia around the same time and those whales that died were later found to have consumed algal toxins. Testing on the whales that died in Alaska waters we not possible because many of the whales had decomposed or could not be retrieved.

Blue whale filmed feeding on krill off New Zealand

Rare footage of a blue whale hoovering up a ball of krill has been taken in the Southern Ocean off the coast of New Zealand. Researchers from the Hatfield Marine Science Center at Oregon State University recorded the whale twisting its body to lunge feed on the tiny prey.

IMMA workshop for the South Pacific held in Samoa

From the 27-31 March 2017, in Apia, Samoa, the IUCN Marine Mammal Protected Areas Task Force invited 23 marine mammal researchers and other experts from 14 Pacific countries for the second Important Marine Mammal Area (IMMA) workshop. This follows the successful first IMMA workshop in the Mediterranean in Oct. 2016 sponsored by the MAVA Foundation.

Three rare whale species photographed together

A researcher taking part in aerial surveys around Cape Cod Bay has captured a very unusual photograph of three rare whales together.

While two of the species, a North Atlantic right whale and sei whale, are found in these waters, the third member of the image, a bowhead whale, is not usually seen in the area. It is probably the first time all three species have been recorded in a photo together.

SeaWorld launches ‘educational’ dolphin shows

Twenty four hours after the final ‘old style’ Blue Horizons captive dolphin show finished at SeaWorld Orlando, the company’s new ‘more educational’ Dolphin Days show has begun.  But SeaWorld’s attempt to align its brand with the growing public uneasiness with whale and dolphin captivity has left many questioning how different the shows are in reality.

Oil pipeline leaks into home of endangered beluga whales

An oil pipeline has leaked into the home waters of one of the most endangered populations of beluga whales.

Alaska's Cook Inlet population, near Anchorage, is thought to number around 340 individuals. They were listed as endangered by the US federal government in 2008 and over 3,000 square miles of their home was protected as critical habitat in 2011. Once thought to number as many as 1300 whales, the population declined dramatically by nearly 50% in the mid-90s.

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