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Longest surviving dolphin in captivity in Japan dies

Nana, a bottlenose dolphin who had been held in captivity for over 40 years, has died at the Shimoda Aquarium in Shizuoka, Japan.

An autopsy will be carried out to determine her cause of death. Last month she became the longest surviving dolphin in captivity in Japan after 42 years and 10 months in confinement.

She was captured off the coast of Ito in 1974 and during her time in captivity gave birth to eight calves according to local reports.

UN wildlife summit agrees steps to protect homes for whales and dolphins

A major United Nation’s wildlife summit has agreed on steps to reduce threats to whales and dolphins around the world by identifying areas where they live, feed and breed.

The 130 nation members attending the 12th Conference of the Parties to the United Nations Convention on Migratory Species (CMS) meeting in Manila adopted the landmark resolution agreeing to help with the identification of areas in the ocean that are important to whales and dolphins.

Dolphin dies at desert marine park

A bottlenose dolphin called Bodie has died at the Dolphinaris marine park in Scottsdale, Arizona, barely a year after the controversial park opened.

A statement from the park said that the dolphin was suffering from a rare muscle disease.

The proposal to establish the desert-based swim-with facility was widely condemned by WDC and others. The owners also have several other captive facilities in Mexico.

The clock to extinction is ticking for North Atlantic right whales

The discovery of yet another dead North Atlantic right whale was made in Massachusetts on October 23, 2017 marking the 16th known death for the critically endangered species since April of this year and the loss of more than 3% of the entire species in a six month period.  This most recent death came only days after scientists at the annual meeting of the North Atlantic Right Whale Consortium predicted that, without significantly red

New study uses facial recognition to identify dolphins

For many years, the leading non-invasive way to identify whales and dolphins has been to use photo-identification. Some markings on certain parts of their bodies, such as tail flukes in some species or dorsal fin in others, can remain largely unchanged throughout their lives which enables scientists to closely follow the lives of individuals.

SeaWorld announces job losses

Captivity giant, SeaWorld has announced that it intends laying off 350 employees following a slump in profits and low attendances at its captivity shows.

According to a spokesperson, the majority of the job losses will be administrative positions at the company's corporate office, as well as its parks in Orlando and San Diego.

New study on brain size and cultural behaviour in whales and dolphins

Authors of a new scientific paper published in the journal Nature Ecology & Evolution have put forward the theory that there is a link between brain size and social and cultural behaviour in whales and dolphins.  The researchers looked at 90 different species of whales and dolphins and suggest the bigger their brains, the more complex their lives can be.

TV Stars back #NotWhaleFood

The colossal amount of plastic waste from single-use water bottles and other sources equates to more than the combined weight of every single living blue whale (the largest creature ever to have lived on earth) and equal to five grocery bags filled with plastic for every single foot of the world’s coastline. This number is set to double to 10 bags full by 2025.

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